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The Kitchen

The kitchen is one of the most dangerous rooms in the house for children.

Keep hot foods and liquids away from young children. According to the National SAFE KIDS Campaign, the vast majority (95 percent) of microwave burns among children are scald burns. Microwave burns are typically caused by spilling hot liquids or food, and injuries are primarily associated with the trunk or the face.

Poisons or toxic materials should be locked up or placed high out of baby's reach.

When cooking, all pot handles should be turned inward so baby can't reach them. Use back burners whenever possible.

Install latches on all drawers and cabinets accessible to baby which contain potentially harmful items.

Keep glassware, knives, appliance cords, placemats and tablecloths out of reach and away from the edge of counters and tables. If your child is visiting someone else's home, ensure dangerous items are stored out of reach during your child's stay.

Stove knobs that are within baby's reach should be childproofed with stove knob covers, or by remembering to take the knob dials off until needed for cooking.

Appliances which continually catch the baby's attention can be latched shut with appliance latches that are easy opened by adults.

Magnets on refrigerators which are small or are glued or otherwise attached to the front piece can easily fall off and/or break and baby may pick it up and swallow it. Business card-type magnets are okay because they can't break, magnets can't come loose if they fall, and they are too big to choke on.

Wash out cleaning bottles before putting them in the trash -- just a drop of cleaning fluid can cause serious harm to a baby.

Plastic wrap and plastic dry cleaning, shopping and garbage bags should be kept from baby, due to the possibility of suffocation and/or choking.

Do not let children see you taking medication, if at all possible. Children mimic what they see. Never refer to medicine as candy.