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Poisonous plants

Toddlers are most often the victims of plant poisonings. When buying a new plant, find out whether it is poisonous by asking the florist, a nursery worker, gardener or landscape designer.

The general rule to follow is plants and children don't mix; separate the two at all times.

The following is a partial list of toxic plants:


amaryllis
anemone
angel trumpet tree
apricot kernels
arrowhead
avocado leaves
azaleas
betel nut palm
bird of paradise
bittersweet
bleeding heart
buckeye
buttercups
caladium
calla lily
castor bean
cherries wild and pit from cultivated cherry if chewed up
christmas rose
crocus
autumn
cyclamem
daffodil
daphne,delphinium
devil's ivy
dieffenbachia or "dumb cane"
elderberry
elephant ear
four o'clock
foxglove
holly berries
horsetail reed
hyacinth
hydrangea
iris
ivy-boston, english and others
jack-in-the pulpit
jasmine (jessamine)
jequirity bean or pea
jerusalem cherry
jimson weed (thorn apple)
jonquil
lantana camare (red sage)
larkspur
laurel
lily-of-the-valley
lobelia
marijuana
mayapple
mistletoe
moonseed
morning glory
mother-in-law plant
mushroom
narcissus
nightshade
oleander
periwinkle
peyote
philodendron
poinsettia
poison hemlock
poison ivy
poison oak
pokeweed
poppy (except california poppy)
potato sprouts
primrose
privet
prunus and prunus virginia
leaves, stems, bark, seed pits from peach, plum, cherry, apricot, nectarine, and choke cherry)
ranunculus
rhododendron
rhubarb blade
rosary pea or bean
star-of-bethlehem
sweet pea
tiger lily
tobacco
tomato vines
water hemlock
wisteria
yew

For a truely impressive list of toxic plants, visit the FDA's unofficial listing of toxic plants at FDA/CFSAN Poisonous Plant Database (Plant List) at the U.S. Food & Drug Administration Center for Food Safety & Applied Nutrition

NEW SINGLE NATIONWIDE PHONE NUMBER FOR POISON CONTROL...FOR POISON HELP, CALL 1-800-222-1222
For more information, visit The American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC).

Keep syrup of ipecac available at home but DON'T USE UNLESS DIRECTED TO DO SO BY THE POISON CONTROL CENTER.